Tax Brackets Aside: How to Handle Workplace Conflict Like A Pro

October 14, 2018

“Everybody’s so scared to be honest with one another.”

                                                                          -Jimmy Butler

 

There's a Jimmy Butler in all of us. I've watched the drama unfold on SportsCenter over the last couple of days about how he showed out in practice, how he doesn't want to be in Minnesota and what the front office is saying about it. At the end of the day and the beginning of the next, he wants to be paid for the value he brings to the organization. Don't you feel the same way about your career? 

 

Quick rundown: Jimmy Butler wants to be traded. He’s unhappy with the Minnesota Timberwolves and feels he will be appreciated somewhere else. Because he puts up numbers (google them) he can be paid wherever he plays and is free to walk after this season. He declined a $100+ million extension from Minnesota (100+ MILLION DOLLARS was an insult?!) Apparently he’s discussed his desire to leave ad nauseum with the front office but nothing has happened. 

 

Taking money off the table and speaking in terms of value and appreciation, think about your own career. How many times have you seen, heard or dealt with this situation? This is us everytime we walk into the doors of a job where we’re not fully content. You know it’s not ideal yet you continue on and vocalize your unhappiness along the way. What happens when there’s friction between the team and the boss? It’s takes your attention off the goal and the team dynamic suffers as a result. Like JB you want the credit you deserve and you’re not getting it, even after all you’ve done for the organization. See the parallel? 

 

If you’re dealing with conflict at work, consider these things to find the right solution. Not only will you alleviate some problems, you might even impress your boss.

 

 

Have ongoing conversations with your manager. Not ONE conversation, several conversations. Your first day on the job is when you need to put recurring meetings on the calendar with your boss and establish the relationship upfront. Discuss expectations, accomplishments and anything relevant to your success in the job. Make sure these conversations are productive and accomplishing the goals at hand. Use this Manager-Employee meeting worksheet as a guide for having a discussion with your manager.

 

Articulate your value through your work. What improvements have you implemented? How have you solved a problem? Telling your boss you deserve a raise just because you feel like it is not the way to go. You were hired to fix something that was wrong. What have you fixed? Go back to your job description if you need clarity on your role or better yet like #1, talk to your boss.

 

 

Exit. Simple as that. It won’t always work out. The job may not turn out as communicated during the interview process. Maybe the culture is bad and there’s turmoil in the company. Maybe the 10% travel became 75% travel. Whatever the case, don’t put your career in a declining state because you’re hanging on to a job for all the wrong reasons.

 

Where are we going from here? In Jimmy Butler’s case, I guess we’ll have to wait and see. 

 

In your case it’s time to have some serious conversations, both with your boss and yourself. If you’re ready for a job change assess your skills, map out your target company and go for it. Easier said than done right? 

 

Job hunting takes time and many candidates skip important steps in this process and end up in the wrong jobs. I’m creating a workbook with everything you need from the self-assessment, interview tips and how to negotiate for more money. I’ll include some templates and worksheets to take with you to interviews too. I want this to be epic for your career so I’m putting some extra touches on it. Send us your email and we’ll send you an exclusive invitation to try it when it’s ready.

 

~N

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