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Better Ways to Engage in Meetings: Replace "Correct Me if I'm Wrong"

Think about that last meeting you were in when you said, “Correct me if I’m wrong…”


Me adding "correct me if I'm wrong" to this email when I know I'm right. ©️ CreateHER Stock
Me adding "correct me if I'm wrong" to this email when I know I'm right. ©️ CreateHER Stock

Why would you need someone to correct you?


It’s giving “I don’t know what I’m talking about” and showing your lack of confidence in what you’re saying. This is an overused way that many people hand off the conversation to someone else. There’s better ways to do that.


I’d be remiss if I didn’t address the other side of the “correct me if I’m wrong” statement:


When you have diligently reviewed your sources and crafted a story that’s not only compelling but the numbers tie to the PENNY. There’s always that one who insists everything about their way of doing and thinking is the only way. So they question and throw curve balls at your analysis but no matter what, you know you’re on point.


Saying “correct me if I’m wrong” while you’re speaking in a meeting devalues your contribution. If you’re not confident in what you’re saying, why would anybody else be?


I get the intent, but try different ways of inviting people to the conversation - without throwing yourself under the bus.


Leave “Correct me if I’m wrong” behind and try these instead:


Invite a specific person to speak.

Someone who knows about the topic being discussed - a subject matter expert or project lead, for example, Their insights can add more to the chat. Instead of asking someone to correct you, ask someone to add to your point or steer the conversation in another direction - if what you're saying is trash. If you find yourself speaking on something you don't know, rephrase your thoughts as questions to the audience who can help bring you up to speed.


Saying “correct me if I’m wrong” while you’re speaking in a meeting devalues your contribution.

  

Instead of 'correct me if I'm wrong' ask 'is that accurate?'

After you speak ask, “Is that accurate?” I use this one all the time. I’m not gonna front and act like I know everything, but my curiosity will help me figure it out.


Using this statement also invites subject matter experts to speak up and educate you on things you don’t know. I’ll bet you you’re not the only one on that call who doesn’t know something.


Open up the conversation.

After you speak, open the conversation up to anyone on the call. A simple statement like, “I’m open to hearing other thoughts and recommendations” is a slick way to hand off a conversation and encourage groupthink. It encourages others to talk and keeps the discussion going.


Use alternatives to "correct me if I'm wrong" to encourage groupthink.
Use alternatives to "correct me if I'm wrong" to encourage groupthink.

Speaking up with confidence is key, and these tips will help you do just that. By using these recommendations instead of “Correct me if I’m wrong,” you’re not just showing that you know your stuff, but you’re also encouraging groupthink. Your voice matters, and how you use it can really make a big difference.


It's OK if you don't know the answers but have the audacity to find out.


Next time you’re in a meeting try one of these and let me know how it goes! What did you think of this post? Leave a comment and let me know!

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